Safeguarding

During 2015/16, there were 2261 Safeguarding Enquiries during the year in Derby. This is higher than the national average (2046) and our comparator average (1299).

During 2015/16, the number of Section 42 Enquiries per 100,000 adults in Derby was 340. This is higher than the national average (239) and our comparator authorities’ average (225).

Derby has a higher Section 42 Enquiry rate of Females (417) compared with the national average (281) and our comparator authorities average (269). Derby has a higher Section 42 Enquiry rate of Males (259) compared with the national average (193) and our comparator authorities’ average (178).

The largest age group is those aged over 85 years (2804) per 100,000 adults. The majority of Section 42 Enquiries are undertaken for adults aged 65 and over compared to those aged below 65.

Black/Black British is the largest ethnicity group for concluded Section 42 Enquiries per 100,000 adults in Derby (390). The next highest ethnic group is White (358).

The most common type of risk in Derby is Physical Abuse (30%) and then Neglect (23%). However, Neglect is the most common type of risk nationally.

During 2015/16, in Derby the most common location of risk is a person’s own home (46%) and then Care Homes (32%).The most common source of risk is Other – Known to Individual (59%) and then Social Care Support (32%).

Derby has the lowest percentage of Section 42 Enquiries where no action was taken (0%). However, Derby has one of the highest percentages where action was taken but risk remains (16%).

During 2015/16, Derby (84%) has a higher percentage of concluded Section 42 Enquiries where action was taken and risk was reduced or removed than the national average (67%) and our comparator authorities’ average (58%).

Derby (32%) is slightly above the national average (27%) and our comparator authorities’ average (29%) for people lacking the capacity to make decisions relating to the safeguarding enquiry.

During 2015/16, Derby (86%) is significantly above both the national average (62%) and our comparator authorities’ average (54%) for individuals who are supported by an Advocate.

For further information about our adult safeguarding policies and procedures, see our adult safeguarding pages.

Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence

Domestic abuse (DA) and sexual violence (SV) represent a significant health burden.  This type of abuse is more common than thought, but quantifying the burden accurately is difficult because of under-reporting.  For example, victims may fear the consequences of disclosing abuse more than abuse itself.  In January 2015 a Health Needs Assessment (HNA) of the issue sought to determine the level of need in the Derby and Derbyshire area.  Information was gathered from existing services including Helpline, Independent Domestic Violence Advisors (IDVA) and the Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC), though the assessment concluded that it is impossible to accurately measure the incidence of DA or SV.  What crime statistics and surveys do suggest, however, is that we are living in an increasingly safer society where crime is falling, but DA and SV are increasing.  This is reflected in data from specialist services that have seen an increase in demand for services.

In order to meet the needs of the population resulting from DA and SV, the HNA made the following recommendations:

Policy and strategy
Ensure that development of the new county-wide strategy for domestic violence and sexual abuse takes into account the findings regarding unmet needs in Derby and Derbyshire.

Prevention
1. Workforce development should be undertaken with statutory and health organisations to increase awareness of domestic abuse and sexual violence, to reduce stigma and challenge stereotypes.
2. Preventative work in schools should continue and should use evidence based interventions to raise awareness of and change attitudes to abuse.
3. Increased levels of preventive work should be undertaken to support national information campaigns.  This work should be culturally sensitive to different population groups and may benefit from a social marketing approach.

Provision
4. Encourage commissioners of all public services to require providers to ensure front line staff are appropriately trained to identify and respond positively to domestic violence.
5. Encourage commissioners to require service providers to undertake an equality impact assessment to ensure that commissioned services are responsive to the needs of all victims, including those from minority groups (e.g. male, LGBT and BME victims).
6. Encourage commissioners to require that all providers, including health and social care providers, carry out baseline assessments to evaluate whether practice is in line with the NICE guidance.  Guidelines and assessment tools are available at https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph50
7. Develop a care pathway to ensure all organisations are able to respond positively to disclosure of domestic violence and signpost to appropriate services.
8. Review commissioning and service provision around emotional support for children living with domestic violence, to build their resilience and mitigate impact on future health and wellbeing.

Recovery
9. Work should be undertaken to understand whether a treatment or recovery model is best suited to people suffering or witnessing abuse.  This work should inform future commissioning and service outcomes.

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