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A long-term order which commits the child to the care of the local authority. It provides extensive powers to local authorities but requires evidence to the court that a child is suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm, or the likelihood of harm is attributable to a lack of adequate parental care or control.

Parental responsibility is shared between the local authority and birth parent/s for the duration of the order. The local authority has majority proportion.

Is the child looked after? Yes.

A time-limited order that places the child under supervision of a social worker or probation officer. The grounds upon which an order can be made are identical to a Care Order.

Parental responsibility is retained, in full, by birth parent/s.

Is the child looked after? No.

Order made pending a full hearing of the application of a Care Order.

Parental responsibility is shared between the local authority and birth parent/s for the duration of the order. Local authority has majority proportion.

Is the child looked after? Yes.

Order made pending a full hearing of the application of a Care Order.

Parental responsibility is retained in full, by birth parent/s.

Is the child looked after? No.

Enables the return of the child to a responsible person.

Parental responsibility is retained in full, by birth parent/s.

Is the child looked after? No.

Replaced by the "Child Arrangements Order, 2014".

An order setting the arrangements to be made as to the person with whom a child is to live.

Parental responsibility - A Residence Order in favour of any person that gives PR for the child.

Is the child looked after? No.

Replaced by the "Child Arrangements Order, 2014".

An order requiring the person with whom a child lives, or is to live, to allow the child to visit or stay with the person named in the order, or for that person and the child otherwise to have contact with each other.

Parental responsibility? N/A

Is the child looked after? No.

An order for settling a specific question which has arisen, or which may arise, in connection with any aspect of parental responsibility for a child, for example, a change of surname where one parent objects. The court is given the responsibility to make the decision.

Parental responsibility - N/A.

Is the child looked after? No.

A long-term order that can be offered to a child for whom adoption is not appropriate but who cannot return to their birth parents to live and could benefit from the permanence provided by a secure family placement. Special Guardians must be over 18 years old and must not be a parent of the child.

Parental responsibility - the Special Guardian gains PR and is entitled to exercise this to the exclusion of any other person with PR for the child (apart from another Special Guardian).

Is the child looked after? No.

A short-term order (up to 15 days) which either removes the child on a short term basis, or allows the child to be kept in a place of safety or requires an alleged abuser to leave the family home. The grounds for an EPO are much easier to prove but successful applicants gain limited powers. Any person can apply for an EPO including a local authority or other authorised body.

Parental responsibility is shared temporarily by the applicant with the birth parent/s.

Is the child looked after? Yes - where the local authority shares parental responsibility.

A short-term order (maximum 7 days) which provides for the compulsory assessment of the child's state of health and development.

Parental responsibility is retained in full, by birth parent/s.

Is the child looked after? No.

No court order is necessary for the police to implement this power which enables the police to remove a child or to keep a child in a safe place.

Parental responsibility is retained in full, by birth parent/s.

Is the child looked after? No.

Following the changes brought in by the Children and Families Act 2014, “contact orders” and “residence orders” under Section 8 of the Children Act 1989 were both replaced on 22 April 2014 with a single “child arrangement order” that covers both. Any existing residence and contact orders remain in force and do not need to be converted, but all new orders can now only be child arrangement orders.

Parental responsibility is with the person/s with whom the child lives for as long as the order is in force.

Is the child looked after? No